Tech News

  1. Nintendo explains Switch Joy-Con connection issues in official statement

    Nintendo explains Switch Joy-Con connection issues in official statementNintendo has issued an official statement regarding the cause of the left Joy-Con connectivity issues plaguing the Switch, vowing that there's no inherent design issue, but a "manufacturing variation."


  2. Amazon is continuing to define what consumers expect

    Amazon is continuing to define what consumers expectMore recent Amazon initiatives such as Prime Now and Flex Delivery aim to deliver orders to your doorstep in two hours or less. When Amazon (AMZN) began offering free two-day shipping to Prime members, that fast shipping time became the new expectation for many customers who were previously accustomed to waiting much longer for their packages. Now, the Seattle-based e-commerce giant is setting the bar even higher  with initiatives such as Prime Now and Amazon Flex, which ship goods to you in two hours and in some cases promise one-hour delivery.


  3. Twitter says it shuttered 377,000 accounts that promote terrorism in six months

    Twitter says it shuttered 377,000 accounts that promote terrorism in six monthsIn its latest transparency report, Twitter said it shuttered a total of 376,890 accounts "for violations related to promotion of terrorism," bringing the 17-month total up to the end of 2016 to 636,248.


  4. India says no to most of Apple's demands

    India says no to most of Apple's demandsApple is not getting any special treatment from the Indian government.  Despite the company’s imminent plans to begin manufacturing iPhones in the country, the Indian government remains committed to not folding to the Cupertino giant’s demands.  SEE ALSO: Apple had its best year ever in world's fastest growing smartphone market When asked if the government has accepted the iPhone maker’s demands, commerce and industry minister Nirmala Sitharaman told Rajya Sabha (Council of States) that the ministry has said "no" to "most" of them. Apple has put up an "unprecedented" list of demands before the government. "Apple India has sought concessions, including duty exemptions on manufacturing and repair units, components, capital equipment including parts and consumables for smartphone manufacturing and service/repair for a period of 15 years," Sitharaman added. Apple sees big potential in India. The company’s CEO paid his maiden visit to the nation last year and expressed desires to bolster the company’s business in the country. Even though India remains one of the few places that has shown strong iPhone sales, there is no easy way for Apple to continue the momentum. For one, more than 50 percent of iPhones sold in the nation last year were iPhone 5s models. The four-year-old iPhone sells for under $300 in the country. Analysts say the company needs to lower the prices of the iPhone, which are higher in India due to domestic import laws. Apple's solution of sorts was to try to convince the Indian government to permit sales of refurbished iPhones — a proposal India was quick to discard.  Now Apple’s biggest bet at making iPhones affordable (and possibly to get India to say yes to refurbished iPhones) is if it could start manufacturing locally.  The Indian government offers various benefits to overseas companies to setup manufacturing plants in India as such efforts help in creation of new jobs and foster the development of cities and states.  Mashable was first to report about Apple’s plans to manufacture iPhone SE in India starting as early as April. It appears Apple will have to make do with the same usual incentives that other international brands get. WATCH: You can now take selfies... with your feet?


  5. Apple just bought the app it once crowned 'most innovative' and made it free for everyone

    Apple just bought the app it once crowned 'most innovative' and made it free for everyoneIf you can't beat it, buy it. That's what Apple did on Wednesday when it acquired an app...


  6. You’re not as secure online as you might think

    You’re not as secure online as you might thinkThe problem with our grasp of cybersecurity isn’t so much that we remain dangerously illiterate — it’s that we think we know what we’re doing anyway. The Pew Research Center was a little more diplomatic than that though in characterizing the findings of a new survey of Americans’ understanding of online security. “Many Americans are unclear about some key cybersecurity topics, terms and concepts,” wrote Kenneth Olmstead and Aaron Smith in their introduction to “What the Public Knows About Cybersecurity.” But it’s that thinking that probably leads many internet users to make choices that they think make them more secure, but, in reality, leave them as exposed as ever.


  7. LinkedIn is a getting a Facebook-like feature

    LinkedIn is a getting a Facebook-like featureLinkedIn has announced Trending Storylines, a new section for web and mobile that shows news and content it thinks you’ll find relevant and interesting. In some ways, it's more useful than Facebook's newsfeed.